90° PARROTS
90° PARROTS
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subtilitas:

Louis Kahn’s unbuilt Hurva Synagogue, as rendered by Kent Larsen for the book Unbuilt Masterworks, a collection of digital constructions of Kahn’s proposals. Image via.
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chazhuttonsfsm:

The lovely Deaf Dumb just sent me a link to this amazing 1890 publication, which, like most publications around that era has a predictably long-winded title:
“A Descriptive Illustrated Catalogue of the Sixty Eight Competitive Designs for the GREAT TOWER for London”
Basically, some people in London had noticed how the Eiffel Tower, built just the year before, had already made back its construction costs and that it wouldn’t be long till every city had it’s own iconic tower, and that London had better hold a competition for its own version. I particularly like the optimistic wording in the preface…
Taking into consideration the enormous popularity of the Eiffel Tower, and the consequent pecuniary benefits conferred on those interested in that undertaking, it is not too much to anticipate that, in the course of a short time, every important country will possess its tall tower. The project of erecting a great tower in London soon found the willing support of many capitalists, who felt convinced that if the scheme were properly laid before the public there would be no great difficulty in accomplishing the object.
How wrong those words would turn out to be…
There’s some great designs in the catalogue, many of them look almost identical to the Eiffel Tower, and at least one which perfectly combines the Eiffel Tower with the Washington Monument. There’s also a fair amount of fantastically optimistic designs, many of which ignore basic engineering constraints. Also entertaining are some of the written descriptions accompanying each design. 
Incredibly, they did start work on the winning design by Stewart, MacLaren and Dunn (design no 37 in the catalogue) and foundations were laid in 1892. Work on the tower gradually got behind schedule however, and the marshy ground they were building on soon became a problem. The construction company created for the tower, The Metropolitan Tower Company then ran into financial trouble and eventually slipped into liquidation, bring work on the tower to a standstill, with only the first 47 meters completed. 
In 1901, the main instigator of the project, Sir Edward Watkin, died and the ‘unsafe’ site was closed after the public began to lose interest. The tower then spent a number of years abandoned before being demolished with dynamite sometime in 1904 (or 1907?).
The original Wembley stadium was eventually built over the site for the 1923 British Empire Exhibition, and the remains of the tower were never seen again until they uncovered some of its footings during the rebuilding of Wembley stadium in the 2000’s.
Amazingly, there’s a few photographs of the tower, which by the time it was demolished was less known as the London Tower, and better known as either Watkins Folly, or The London Stump.



There’s also this lovely poster advertising Wembley Park, showing the tower as it could have looked.

There’s also this paper on the subject, which also mentions Chicago’s similar competition for a tower, which I haven’t actually read (but plan to later). Plus this page seems to have some more precise history on the subject. this article, is worth a read and has some additional info on Watkins reasons for wanting to build the tower in the first place.
chazhuttonsfsm:

The lovely Deaf Dumb just sent me a link to this amazing 1890 publication, which, like most publications around that era has a predictably long-winded title:
“A Descriptive Illustrated Catalogue of the Sixty Eight Competitive Designs for the GREAT TOWER for London”
Basically, some people in London had noticed how the Eiffel Tower, built just the year before, had already made back its construction costs and that it wouldn’t be long till every city had it’s own iconic tower, and that London had better hold a competition for its own version. I particularly like the optimistic wording in the preface…
Taking into consideration the enormous popularity of the Eiffel Tower, and the consequent pecuniary benefits conferred on those interested in that undertaking, it is not too much to anticipate that, in the course of a short time, every important country will possess its tall tower. The project of erecting a great tower in London soon found the willing support of many capitalists, who felt convinced that if the scheme were properly laid before the public there would be no great difficulty in accomplishing the object.
How wrong those words would turn out to be…
There’s some great designs in the catalogue, many of them look almost identical to the Eiffel Tower, and at least one which perfectly combines the Eiffel Tower with the Washington Monument. There’s also a fair amount of fantastically optimistic designs, many of which ignore basic engineering constraints. Also entertaining are some of the written descriptions accompanying each design. 
Incredibly, they did start work on the winning design by Stewart, MacLaren and Dunn (design no 37 in the catalogue) and foundations were laid in 1892. Work on the tower gradually got behind schedule however, and the marshy ground they were building on soon became a problem. The construction company created for the tower, The Metropolitan Tower Company then ran into financial trouble and eventually slipped into liquidation, bring work on the tower to a standstill, with only the first 47 meters completed. 
In 1901, the main instigator of the project, Sir Edward Watkin, died and the ‘unsafe’ site was closed after the public began to lose interest. The tower then spent a number of years abandoned before being demolished with dynamite sometime in 1904 (or 1907?).
The original Wembley stadium was eventually built over the site for the 1923 British Empire Exhibition, and the remains of the tower were never seen again until they uncovered some of its footings during the rebuilding of Wembley stadium in the 2000’s.
Amazingly, there’s a few photographs of the tower, which by the time it was demolished was less known as the London Tower, and better known as either Watkins Folly, or The London Stump.



There’s also this lovely poster advertising Wembley Park, showing the tower as it could have looked.

There’s also this paper on the subject, which also mentions Chicago’s similar competition for a tower, which I haven’t actually read (but plan to later). Plus this page seems to have some more precise history on the subject. this article, is worth a read and has some additional info on Watkins reasons for wanting to build the tower in the first place.
chazhuttonsfsm:

The lovely Deaf Dumb just sent me a link to this amazing 1890 publication, which, like most publications around that era has a predictably long-winded title:
“A Descriptive Illustrated Catalogue of the Sixty Eight Competitive Designs for the GREAT TOWER for London”
Basically, some people in London had noticed how the Eiffel Tower, built just the year before, had already made back its construction costs and that it wouldn’t be long till every city had it’s own iconic tower, and that London had better hold a competition for its own version. I particularly like the optimistic wording in the preface…
Taking into consideration the enormous popularity of the Eiffel Tower, and the consequent pecuniary benefits conferred on those interested in that undertaking, it is not too much to anticipate that, in the course of a short time, every important country will possess its tall tower. The project of erecting a great tower in London soon found the willing support of many capitalists, who felt convinced that if the scheme were properly laid before the public there would be no great difficulty in accomplishing the object.
How wrong those words would turn out to be…
There’s some great designs in the catalogue, many of them look almost identical to the Eiffel Tower, and at least one which perfectly combines the Eiffel Tower with the Washington Monument. There’s also a fair amount of fantastically optimistic designs, many of which ignore basic engineering constraints. Also entertaining are some of the written descriptions accompanying each design. 
Incredibly, they did start work on the winning design by Stewart, MacLaren and Dunn (design no 37 in the catalogue) and foundations were laid in 1892. Work on the tower gradually got behind schedule however, and the marshy ground they were building on soon became a problem. The construction company created for the tower, The Metropolitan Tower Company then ran into financial trouble and eventually slipped into liquidation, bring work on the tower to a standstill, with only the first 47 meters completed. 
In 1901, the main instigator of the project, Sir Edward Watkin, died and the ‘unsafe’ site was closed after the public began to lose interest. The tower then spent a number of years abandoned before being demolished with dynamite sometime in 1904 (or 1907?).
The original Wembley stadium was eventually built over the site for the 1923 British Empire Exhibition, and the remains of the tower were never seen again until they uncovered some of its footings during the rebuilding of Wembley stadium in the 2000’s.
Amazingly, there’s a few photographs of the tower, which by the time it was demolished was less known as the London Tower, and better known as either Watkins Folly, or The London Stump.



There’s also this lovely poster advertising Wembley Park, showing the tower as it could have looked.

There’s also this paper on the subject, which also mentions Chicago’s similar competition for a tower, which I haven’t actually read (but plan to later). Plus this page seems to have some more precise history on the subject. this article, is worth a read and has some additional info on Watkins reasons for wanting to build the tower in the first place.
chazhuttonsfsm:

The lovely Deaf Dumb just sent me a link to this amazing 1890 publication, which, like most publications around that era has a predictably long-winded title:
“A Descriptive Illustrated Catalogue of the Sixty Eight Competitive Designs for the GREAT TOWER for London”
Basically, some people in London had noticed how the Eiffel Tower, built just the year before, had already made back its construction costs and that it wouldn’t be long till every city had it’s own iconic tower, and that London had better hold a competition for its own version. I particularly like the optimistic wording in the preface…
Taking into consideration the enormous popularity of the Eiffel Tower, and the consequent pecuniary benefits conferred on those interested in that undertaking, it is not too much to anticipate that, in the course of a short time, every important country will possess its tall tower. The project of erecting a great tower in London soon found the willing support of many capitalists, who felt convinced that if the scheme were properly laid before the public there would be no great difficulty in accomplishing the object.
How wrong those words would turn out to be…
There’s some great designs in the catalogue, many of them look almost identical to the Eiffel Tower, and at least one which perfectly combines the Eiffel Tower with the Washington Monument. There’s also a fair amount of fantastically optimistic designs, many of which ignore basic engineering constraints. Also entertaining are some of the written descriptions accompanying each design. 
Incredibly, they did start work on the winning design by Stewart, MacLaren and Dunn (design no 37 in the catalogue) and foundations were laid in 1892. Work on the tower gradually got behind schedule however, and the marshy ground they were building on soon became a problem. The construction company created for the tower, The Metropolitan Tower Company then ran into financial trouble and eventually slipped into liquidation, bring work on the tower to a standstill, with only the first 47 meters completed. 
In 1901, the main instigator of the project, Sir Edward Watkin, died and the ‘unsafe’ site was closed after the public began to lose interest. The tower then spent a number of years abandoned before being demolished with dynamite sometime in 1904 (or 1907?).
The original Wembley stadium was eventually built over the site for the 1923 British Empire Exhibition, and the remains of the tower were never seen again until they uncovered some of its footings during the rebuilding of Wembley stadium in the 2000’s.
Amazingly, there’s a few photographs of the tower, which by the time it was demolished was less known as the London Tower, and better known as either Watkins Folly, or The London Stump.



There’s also this lovely poster advertising Wembley Park, showing the tower as it could have looked.

There’s also this paper on the subject, which also mentions Chicago’s similar competition for a tower, which I haven’t actually read (but plan to later). Plus this page seems to have some more precise history on the subject. this article, is worth a read and has some additional info on Watkins reasons for wanting to build the tower in the first place.
chazhuttonsfsm:

The lovely Deaf Dumb just sent me a link to this amazing 1890 publication, which, like most publications around that era has a predictably long-winded title:
“A Descriptive Illustrated Catalogue of the Sixty Eight Competitive Designs for the GREAT TOWER for London”
Basically, some people in London had noticed how the Eiffel Tower, built just the year before, had already made back its construction costs and that it wouldn’t be long till every city had it’s own iconic tower, and that London had better hold a competition for its own version. I particularly like the optimistic wording in the preface…
Taking into consideration the enormous popularity of the Eiffel Tower, and the consequent pecuniary benefits conferred on those interested in that undertaking, it is not too much to anticipate that, in the course of a short time, every important country will possess its tall tower. The project of erecting a great tower in London soon found the willing support of many capitalists, who felt convinced that if the scheme were properly laid before the public there would be no great difficulty in accomplishing the object.
How wrong those words would turn out to be…
There’s some great designs in the catalogue, many of them look almost identical to the Eiffel Tower, and at least one which perfectly combines the Eiffel Tower with the Washington Monument. There’s also a fair amount of fantastically optimistic designs, many of which ignore basic engineering constraints. Also entertaining are some of the written descriptions accompanying each design. 
Incredibly, they did start work on the winning design by Stewart, MacLaren and Dunn (design no 37 in the catalogue) and foundations were laid in 1892. Work on the tower gradually got behind schedule however, and the marshy ground they were building on soon became a problem. The construction company created for the tower, The Metropolitan Tower Company then ran into financial trouble and eventually slipped into liquidation, bring work on the tower to a standstill, with only the first 47 meters completed. 
In 1901, the main instigator of the project, Sir Edward Watkin, died and the ‘unsafe’ site was closed after the public began to lose interest. The tower then spent a number of years abandoned before being demolished with dynamite sometime in 1904 (or 1907?).
The original Wembley stadium was eventually built over the site for the 1923 British Empire Exhibition, and the remains of the tower were never seen again until they uncovered some of its footings during the rebuilding of Wembley stadium in the 2000’s.
Amazingly, there’s a few photographs of the tower, which by the time it was demolished was less known as the London Tower, and better known as either Watkins Folly, or The London Stump.



There’s also this lovely poster advertising Wembley Park, showing the tower as it could have looked.

There’s also this paper on the subject, which also mentions Chicago’s similar competition for a tower, which I haven’t actually read (but plan to later). Plus this page seems to have some more precise history on the subject. this article, is worth a read and has some additional info on Watkins reasons for wanting to build the tower in the first place.
chazhuttonsfsm:

The lovely Deaf Dumb just sent me a link to this amazing 1890 publication, which, like most publications around that era has a predictably long-winded title:
“A Descriptive Illustrated Catalogue of the Sixty Eight Competitive Designs for the GREAT TOWER for London”
Basically, some people in London had noticed how the Eiffel Tower, built just the year before, had already made back its construction costs and that it wouldn’t be long till every city had it’s own iconic tower, and that London had better hold a competition for its own version. I particularly like the optimistic wording in the preface…
Taking into consideration the enormous popularity of the Eiffel Tower, and the consequent pecuniary benefits conferred on those interested in that undertaking, it is not too much to anticipate that, in the course of a short time, every important country will possess its tall tower. The project of erecting a great tower in London soon found the willing support of many capitalists, who felt convinced that if the scheme were properly laid before the public there would be no great difficulty in accomplishing the object.
How wrong those words would turn out to be…
There’s some great designs in the catalogue, many of them look almost identical to the Eiffel Tower, and at least one which perfectly combines the Eiffel Tower with the Washington Monument. There’s also a fair amount of fantastically optimistic designs, many of which ignore basic engineering constraints. Also entertaining are some of the written descriptions accompanying each design. 
Incredibly, they did start work on the winning design by Stewart, MacLaren and Dunn (design no 37 in the catalogue) and foundations were laid in 1892. Work on the tower gradually got behind schedule however, and the marshy ground they were building on soon became a problem. The construction company created for the tower, The Metropolitan Tower Company then ran into financial trouble and eventually slipped into liquidation, bring work on the tower to a standstill, with only the first 47 meters completed. 
In 1901, the main instigator of the project, Sir Edward Watkin, died and the ‘unsafe’ site was closed after the public began to lose interest. The tower then spent a number of years abandoned before being demolished with dynamite sometime in 1904 (or 1907?).
The original Wembley stadium was eventually built over the site for the 1923 British Empire Exhibition, and the remains of the tower were never seen again until they uncovered some of its footings during the rebuilding of Wembley stadium in the 2000’s.
Amazingly, there’s a few photographs of the tower, which by the time it was demolished was less known as the London Tower, and better known as either Watkins Folly, or The London Stump.



There’s also this lovely poster advertising Wembley Park, showing the tower as it could have looked.

There’s also this paper on the subject, which also mentions Chicago’s similar competition for a tower, which I haven’t actually read (but plan to later). Plus this page seems to have some more precise history on the subject. this article, is worth a read and has some additional info on Watkins reasons for wanting to build the tower in the first place.
chazhuttonsfsm:

The lovely Deaf Dumb just sent me a link to this amazing 1890 publication, which, like most publications around that era has a predictably long-winded title:
“A Descriptive Illustrated Catalogue of the Sixty Eight Competitive Designs for the GREAT TOWER for London”
Basically, some people in London had noticed how the Eiffel Tower, built just the year before, had already made back its construction costs and that it wouldn’t be long till every city had it’s own iconic tower, and that London had better hold a competition for its own version. I particularly like the optimistic wording in the preface…
Taking into consideration the enormous popularity of the Eiffel Tower, and the consequent pecuniary benefits conferred on those interested in that undertaking, it is not too much to anticipate that, in the course of a short time, every important country will possess its tall tower. The project of erecting a great tower in London soon found the willing support of many capitalists, who felt convinced that if the scheme were properly laid before the public there would be no great difficulty in accomplishing the object.
How wrong those words would turn out to be…
There’s some great designs in the catalogue, many of them look almost identical to the Eiffel Tower, and at least one which perfectly combines the Eiffel Tower with the Washington Monument. There’s also a fair amount of fantastically optimistic designs, many of which ignore basic engineering constraints. Also entertaining are some of the written descriptions accompanying each design. 
Incredibly, they did start work on the winning design by Stewart, MacLaren and Dunn (design no 37 in the catalogue) and foundations were laid in 1892. Work on the tower gradually got behind schedule however, and the marshy ground they were building on soon became a problem. The construction company created for the tower, The Metropolitan Tower Company then ran into financial trouble and eventually slipped into liquidation, bring work on the tower to a standstill, with only the first 47 meters completed. 
In 1901, the main instigator of the project, Sir Edward Watkin, died and the ‘unsafe’ site was closed after the public began to lose interest. The tower then spent a number of years abandoned before being demolished with dynamite sometime in 1904 (or 1907?).
The original Wembley stadium was eventually built over the site for the 1923 British Empire Exhibition, and the remains of the tower were never seen again until they uncovered some of its footings during the rebuilding of Wembley stadium in the 2000’s.
Amazingly, there’s a few photographs of the tower, which by the time it was demolished was less known as the London Tower, and better known as either Watkins Folly, or The London Stump.



There’s also this lovely poster advertising Wembley Park, showing the tower as it could have looked.

There’s also this paper on the subject, which also mentions Chicago’s similar competition for a tower, which I haven’t actually read (but plan to later). Plus this page seems to have some more precise history on the subject. this article, is worth a read and has some additional info on Watkins reasons for wanting to build the tower in the first place.
chazhuttonsfsm:

The lovely Deaf Dumb just sent me a link to this amazing 1890 publication, which, like most publications around that era has a predictably long-winded title:
“A Descriptive Illustrated Catalogue of the Sixty Eight Competitive Designs for the GREAT TOWER for London”
Basically, some people in London had noticed how the Eiffel Tower, built just the year before, had already made back its construction costs and that it wouldn’t be long till every city had it’s own iconic tower, and that London had better hold a competition for its own version. I particularly like the optimistic wording in the preface…
Taking into consideration the enormous popularity of the Eiffel Tower, and the consequent pecuniary benefits conferred on those interested in that undertaking, it is not too much to anticipate that, in the course of a short time, every important country will possess its tall tower. The project of erecting a great tower in London soon found the willing support of many capitalists, who felt convinced that if the scheme were properly laid before the public there would be no great difficulty in accomplishing the object.
How wrong those words would turn out to be…
There’s some great designs in the catalogue, many of them look almost identical to the Eiffel Tower, and at least one which perfectly combines the Eiffel Tower with the Washington Monument. There’s also a fair amount of fantastically optimistic designs, many of which ignore basic engineering constraints. Also entertaining are some of the written descriptions accompanying each design. 
Incredibly, they did start work on the winning design by Stewart, MacLaren and Dunn (design no 37 in the catalogue) and foundations were laid in 1892. Work on the tower gradually got behind schedule however, and the marshy ground they were building on soon became a problem. The construction company created for the tower, The Metropolitan Tower Company then ran into financial trouble and eventually slipped into liquidation, bring work on the tower to a standstill, with only the first 47 meters completed. 
In 1901, the main instigator of the project, Sir Edward Watkin, died and the ‘unsafe’ site was closed after the public began to lose interest. The tower then spent a number of years abandoned before being demolished with dynamite sometime in 1904 (or 1907?).
The original Wembley stadium was eventually built over the site for the 1923 British Empire Exhibition, and the remains of the tower were never seen again until they uncovered some of its footings during the rebuilding of Wembley stadium in the 2000’s.
Amazingly, there’s a few photographs of the tower, which by the time it was demolished was less known as the London Tower, and better known as either Watkins Folly, or The London Stump.



There’s also this lovely poster advertising Wembley Park, showing the tower as it could have looked.

There’s also this paper on the subject, which also mentions Chicago’s similar competition for a tower, which I haven’t actually read (but plan to later). Plus this page seems to have some more precise history on the subject. this article, is worth a read and has some additional info on Watkins reasons for wanting to build the tower in the first place.
chazhuttonsfsm:

The lovely Deaf Dumb just sent me a link to this amazing 1890 publication, which, like most publications around that era has a predictably long-winded title:
“A Descriptive Illustrated Catalogue of the Sixty Eight Competitive Designs for the GREAT TOWER for London”
Basically, some people in London had noticed how the Eiffel Tower, built just the year before, had already made back its construction costs and that it wouldn’t be long till every city had it’s own iconic tower, and that London had better hold a competition for its own version. I particularly like the optimistic wording in the preface…
Taking into consideration the enormous popularity of the Eiffel Tower, and the consequent pecuniary benefits conferred on those interested in that undertaking, it is not too much to anticipate that, in the course of a short time, every important country will possess its tall tower. The project of erecting a great tower in London soon found the willing support of many capitalists, who felt convinced that if the scheme were properly laid before the public there would be no great difficulty in accomplishing the object.
How wrong those words would turn out to be…
There’s some great designs in the catalogue, many of them look almost identical to the Eiffel Tower, and at least one which perfectly combines the Eiffel Tower with the Washington Monument. There’s also a fair amount of fantastically optimistic designs, many of which ignore basic engineering constraints. Also entertaining are some of the written descriptions accompanying each design. 
Incredibly, they did start work on the winning design by Stewart, MacLaren and Dunn (design no 37 in the catalogue) and foundations were laid in 1892. Work on the tower gradually got behind schedule however, and the marshy ground they were building on soon became a problem. The construction company created for the tower, The Metropolitan Tower Company then ran into financial trouble and eventually slipped into liquidation, bring work on the tower to a standstill, with only the first 47 meters completed. 
In 1901, the main instigator of the project, Sir Edward Watkin, died and the ‘unsafe’ site was closed after the public began to lose interest. The tower then spent a number of years abandoned before being demolished with dynamite sometime in 1904 (or 1907?).
The original Wembley stadium was eventually built over the site for the 1923 British Empire Exhibition, and the remains of the tower were never seen again until they uncovered some of its footings during the rebuilding of Wembley stadium in the 2000’s.
Amazingly, there’s a few photographs of the tower, which by the time it was demolished was less known as the London Tower, and better known as either Watkins Folly, or The London Stump.



There’s also this lovely poster advertising Wembley Park, showing the tower as it could have looked.

There’s also this paper on the subject, which also mentions Chicago’s similar competition for a tower, which I haven’t actually read (but plan to later). Plus this page seems to have some more precise history on the subject. this article, is worth a read and has some additional info on Watkins reasons for wanting to build the tower in the first place.
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dotmophotography:

:: Urban Fictions by Richard Rowland :: Urban Fictions is a photographic and video project funded by Arts Council England, examining the emergence of simulated urban developments in eastern China. These idealised reconstructions appear as hyperreal utopias that seek to create rather than reflect historical reality; illusory spaces connecting to the broader national narrative of modern-day China, one of consumerism, spectacle and economic expansion.
dotmophotography:

:: Urban Fictions by Richard Rowland :: Urban Fictions is a photographic and video project funded by Arts Council England, examining the emergence of simulated urban developments in eastern China. These idealised reconstructions appear as hyperreal utopias that seek to create rather than reflect historical reality; illusory spaces connecting to the broader national narrative of modern-day China, one of consumerism, spectacle and economic expansion.
dotmophotography:

:: Urban Fictions by Richard Rowland :: Urban Fictions is a photographic and video project funded by Arts Council England, examining the emergence of simulated urban developments in eastern China. These idealised reconstructions appear as hyperreal utopias that seek to create rather than reflect historical reality; illusory spaces connecting to the broader national narrative of modern-day China, one of consumerism, spectacle and economic expansion.
dotmophotography:

:: Urban Fictions by Richard Rowland :: Urban Fictions is a photographic and video project funded by Arts Council England, examining the emergence of simulated urban developments in eastern China. These idealised reconstructions appear as hyperreal utopias that seek to create rather than reflect historical reality; illusory spaces connecting to the broader national narrative of modern-day China, one of consumerism, spectacle and economic expansion.
dotmophotography:

:: Urban Fictions by Richard Rowland :: Urban Fictions is a photographic and video project funded by Arts Council England, examining the emergence of simulated urban developments in eastern China. These idealised reconstructions appear as hyperreal utopias that seek to create rather than reflect historical reality; illusory spaces connecting to the broader national narrative of modern-day China, one of consumerism, spectacle and economic expansion.
dotmophotography:

:: Urban Fictions by Richard Rowland :: Urban Fictions is a photographic and video project funded by Arts Council England, examining the emergence of simulated urban developments in eastern China. These idealised reconstructions appear as hyperreal utopias that seek to create rather than reflect historical reality; illusory spaces connecting to the broader national narrative of modern-day China, one of consumerism, spectacle and economic expansion.
dotmophotography:

:: Urban Fictions by Richard Rowland :: Urban Fictions is a photographic and video project funded by Arts Council England, examining the emergence of simulated urban developments in eastern China. These idealised reconstructions appear as hyperreal utopias that seek to create rather than reflect historical reality; illusory spaces connecting to the broader national narrative of modern-day China, one of consumerism, spectacle and economic expansion.
dotmophotography:

:: Urban Fictions by Richard Rowland :: Urban Fictions is a photographic and video project funded by Arts Council England, examining the emergence of simulated urban developments in eastern China. These idealised reconstructions appear as hyperreal utopias that seek to create rather than reflect historical reality; illusory spaces connecting to the broader national narrative of modern-day China, one of consumerism, spectacle and economic expansion.
dotmophotography:

:: Urban Fictions by Richard Rowland :: Urban Fictions is a photographic and video project funded by Arts Council England, examining the emergence of simulated urban developments in eastern China. These idealised reconstructions appear as hyperreal utopias that seek to create rather than reflect historical reality; illusory spaces connecting to the broader national narrative of modern-day China, one of consumerism, spectacle and economic expansion.
dotmophotography:

:: Urban Fictions by Richard Rowland :: Urban Fictions is a photographic and video project funded by Arts Council England, examining the emergence of simulated urban developments in eastern China. These idealised reconstructions appear as hyperreal utopias that seek to create rather than reflect historical reality; illusory spaces connecting to the broader national narrative of modern-day China, one of consumerism, spectacle and economic expansion.
+
pheldaus:

Bernd and Hilla Becher